fifesmallholder

musings of a scottish smallholder

Heir and a Spare November 17, 2011


Its tupping time at Fifesmallholder

tup and ram at fifesmallholder

We have been a bit later putting our boys in with our girls this year.  We have had two bad winters in a row and an April lambing will hopefully mean that the lambs get a better start in life.

It is a good idea to make sure that both boys (known as a tup or ram) and girls (known as a ewe) are in peak condition.

Flush The Ewes

To improve the chances of twins, you can help the ewe produce more eggs at ovulation. To do this you can put the ewes on fresh grazing for a few days/weeks along with a mineral lick, this will give the ewe a boost in condition. Usually resulting in an increase in eggs ovulated…

A ewe will come in season every 21 days until she has conceived. I advise that you put a raddle/harness on your Ram. Every 21 days you should change the colour of the crayon. Doing this will allow you take note of what period the ewe will lamb in.

The ewes gestation period is typically 147 days. Allow 145-149 days and you will be safe.

* Tip – make sure this years ewe lambs are well away from all this mullarkey – otherwise you might end up with a teenage mother*

This Is What They Have Been Waiting All Year For

Your tups need to be firing on all cylinders! Peak fitness is essential, the most common reason for a lazy tup will be poor feet. Keep them trimmed and tidy. We have two unproven tups this year so I have hedged my bets with an heir and a spare.  They keep each other company throughout the summer, and mean that I have a mix of genes in my lambs, a backup in case one of them gets sick, and a guarantee that at least one of them will perform.

Advertisements
 

Tup August 30, 2011


www.fifesmallholder.co.uk

This year we are going to use a new tup. He is a Beltex cross and this breed is known for their double muscled hind legs. Popular with butchers because it gives a good sized leg of lamb.